top of page

38 Months Since the January 6 Attack on the Capitol and DOJ Investigations and Legal Actions Continue



March 6, 2024, marked 38 months since the tumultuous attack on the U.S. Capitol, and even as the primary instigator of the events of January 6, 2021, former President Donald Trump moves to clinch the GOP presidential nomination, the Department of Justice (DOJ) said it remains committed to holding those responsible accountable.

Under the continued leadership of the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Columbia and the FBI’s Washington Field Office, officials said the investigation into the Capitol breach has progressed at an unprecedented speed and scale. As of October 14, 2022, the losses resulting from the attack, which disrupted a joint session of the U.S. Congress attempting to certify President Joe Biden’s victory, are estimated at approximately $2.9 million.

The DOJ said its resolve to prosecute those who committed crimes on that fateful day remains steadfast. According to public court documents on the Capitol Breach Investigation Resource Page, more than 1,358 defendants have been charged in nearly all 50 states and the District of Columbia.

Criminal charges range from assaulting, resisting, or impeding officers to entering or remaining in a restricted federal building or grounds. Notably, approximately 140 police officers were assaulted during the attack, including officers from the U.S. Capitol Police and the Metropolitan Police Department.

Five officers eventually died following the mob attack.

The breakdown of criminal charges includes:

  • Approximately 486 defendants were charged with assaulting officers or employees.

  • Eleven individuals were arrested for attacking members of the media.

  • More than 350 defendants have been charged with obstructing official proceedings.

Regarding pleas, approximately 769 individuals have pleaded guilty to various federal charges, the DOJ noted in a news release. Of these, 238 have pleaded guilty to felonies, including federal charges of assaulting law enforcement officers and felonious obstruction during a civil disorder. A total of 95 individuals have pleaded guilty to assaulting law enforcement officers, with 130 sentenced to prison terms of up to 151 months.

Trials have resulted in 152 individuals being found guilty, with 81 convicted of assaulting, resisting, or impeding officers and/or obstructing officers during a civil disorder.

Sentencing is ongoing, with approximately 497 federal defendants sentenced to periods of incarceration and 164 sentenced to home detention. Notably, one individual has been sentenced to more than 14 years in prison for assaulting officers.

The twice-impeached and four-times indicted former president has continued to force delays in the prosecution of the 91 felony charges he faces, many of which stem from his alleged role in the Capitol attack.

Despite his alleged crimes, which also include sexual assault, business fraud, and trading favors with foreign enemies, Trump emerged victorious on Super Tuesday, catapulting him ever closer to a rematch with Biden in the November general election.

Meanwhile, the FBI said it continues to seek public assistance in identifying individuals involved in the January 6 attack, with citizens from around the country already providing invaluable help. The FBI currently has ten videos of suspects wanted for violent assaults on federal officers, including those who assaulted members of the media on January 6.

Among the individuals the FBI is seeking public tips to identify or locate are Evan Neumann, Adam Villarreal, and Paul Belosic, who allegedly were involved in violent altercations with law enforcement officers during the attack. The FBI encourages the public to visit fbi.gov/capitol violence to view photos and videos and provide any information that may aid these ongoing investigations.

“We have deployed our full investigative resources and are working closely with our federal, state, and local partners to aggressively pursue those involved in these criminal activities,” the DOJ said in the news release.

Comentários


The Reporter Newspaper
bottom of page